Just a quick temporary post to show the power of the raging water here at Ponytail Falls!
________________________________________
It’s another rainy day here in Oregon, but that isn’t stopping Dan @danfieldsphotog and me from heading out and continuing our epic adventure! So many mind-blowing world-class waterfalls to shoot. So far, we have shot 7 different falls and 4 more are on the schedule today. We have hiked for miles up and down mountains on very slick and wet rocky trails with 45 pound packs………such a great challenge! (at Ponytail Falls, Oregon (Temporary Post))

________________________________________
Location: Encinitas, California, USA
________________________________________
I took this shot just as the sun was dipping below the horizon at a reef in Encinitas California. You would never know from the photo, but the surf was really big, the incoming tide was pushing in hard, and the beach was actually really crowded with both locals and tourists enjoying the sunset. Long exposure times can make a hectic scene look calm and surreal.
________________________________________
My Gear & Settings
⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇
🔹 Camera: Sony A7R
🔹 Lens: Zeiss Distagon T* 21mm f/2.8
🔹 Aperture: f/11
🔹 ISO: 100
🔹 Mode: Manual
🔹 Exposure Time: 210 seconds
🔹 Tripod: Gitzo 5 Series
🔹 Head: RRS BH-55
🔹 Filters: 10-Stop ND & 0.9 SGND
🔹 This is a single shot, no blending of multiple images
_____________________________________
SEASCAPE PHOTO TIPS - Shooting seascapes is very similar to shooting landscapes. You need to include some foreground interest to add depth to the image and lead the viewer’s eyes into the scene. One way to do this is to look for interesting rock formations, logs, or other stationary objects. But don’t just find a rock and place it randomly in your photo. Try and find a pattern or line to lead the viewer into the shot. Experiment with different points of view, camera heights, lenses, and angles to see what works best.

Another important factor to consider with seascapes, or any photos containing water, is shutter speed. This can have a significant impact on the overall look of your photo. A faster shutter speed will freeze the action and will show the water without any motion blur. This is the most realistic way to capture water and would be what non-photographers would expect to see. But we know photography isn’t always about realism. Even though I prefer to shoot with longer shutter speeds, there are no set rules.
________________________________________
Thanks so much for the features/mentions this week from:
⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇
🔹 @NorthCountyPetServices
🔹 @phototag_it
🔹 @phototag_sky
🔹 @infinity_shotz
🔹 @exoringtheglobe
🔹 @sunset_hd
🔹 @clubsocial
🔹 @carlos_koji
🔹 @phenomenalshot
🔹 @alecohe
______________
(at Encinitas, California, USA)

________________________________________
Location: Yosemite National Park, California, USA
________________________________________
I took this shot about 30 minutes before sunrise at Gates of the Valley in Yosemite. There had been very few clouds on our last trip so my great friend Dan Fields @danfieldsphotog and I were really surprised when we got up early and saw the cloud cover. We loaded up our gear and headed to this spot hoping to see a colorful sunrise. We were both very happy when we pulled up and saw the sky turning a beautiful pastel blue and pink. We set up our gear and only had time to get a few shots before the sun came up and all the color disappeared.
________________________________________
My Gear & Settings
⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇
🔹 Camera: Canon 1Dx
🔹 Lens: Canon 24-105mm
🔹 Aperture: f/9
🔹 ISO: 640
🔹 Mode: Manual
🔹 Exposure Time: 13 seconds
🔹 Tripod: Gitzo 5 Series
🔹 Head: RRS BH-55
🔹 Filter: Singh-Ray Color Combo
🔹 This is a single shot, no blending of multiple images
_____________________________________
SUNRISE PHOTO TIPS - Do your advance work and visit the site the day before you plan to shoot. Determine the gear that you will use. Check the weather forecast and dress appropriately. Note the sunrise time and arrive at least one hour earlier. Determine where the sun will rise in relation to the spot you are shooting. Bump up the ISO to help compensate for the dark shadows. Remember that sunrise photos are usually best when taken before the sun actually rises because there is a lot more color in the sky.
________________________________________
Thanks so much for the features/mentions this week from:
⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇
🔹 @NorthCountyPetServices
🔹 @wonderful_places
🔹 @jaw_dropping_shots
🔹 @neradog
🔹 @hdr_greece
🔹 @dream_spots
🔹 @great_image
🔹 @sky_perfection
🔹 @clubsocial
🔹 @carlos_koji
🔹 @phenomenalshot
🔹 @alecohe
________________________________________
Follow my hub @epic_captures (tag # epic_captures) to be treated to some of the best images on Instagram.
_________________________________________ (at Yosemite National Park)

________________________________________
Location: Yosemite National Park, California, USA
________________________________________
I took this shot just as the sun was rising over Yosemite Valley. As the warm rays of the sun hit the leaves of the trees on the bank of the Merced River, we watched in awe as the leaves exploded with color as though they were shimmering. The stillness of the river and calm winds, resulted in a colorful reflection in the water. As usual, Dan Fields @danfieldsphotog went on this epic adventure with me.
________________________________________
My Gear & Settings
⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇
🔹 Camera: Canon 1Dx
🔹 Lens: Canon 16-35 f/2.8L II
🔹 Aperture: f/11
🔹 ISO: 100
🔹 Mode: Manual
🔹 Exposure Time: 1 second
🔹 Tripod: Gitzo 5 Series
🔹 Head: RRS BH-55
🔹 Filter: Singh-Ray Color Combo
🔹 This is a single shot, no blending of multiple images
_____________________________________
PHOTO TIP - WATER REFLECTIONS - Every good photograph starts off with a good composition, so this is the first thing to consider. Your best options for capturing reflections are protected waters such as lakes, rivers, and ponds that are sheltered from the wind. Early mornings are generally the best time to shoot reflections. Determine whether to shoot form a low or high perspective to capture the best composition. Make sure your aperture is set so that the entire scene is in focus. Use a sturdy tripod, mirror lockup, and a remote shutter release to help ensure a sharp image.
________________________________________
Thanks so much for the features/mentions this week from:
⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇
🔹 @NorthCountyPetServices
🔹 @sky_perfection
🔹 @bestnatureshots
🔹 @ptk_nature
🔹 @beautifulworld_pics1
🔹 @clubsocial
🔹 @carlos_koji
🔹 @phenomenalshot
🔹 @alecohe
________________________________________
Follow my hub @epic_captures (tag # epic_captures) to be treated to some of the best images on Instagram.
_________________________________________ (at Yosemite National Park)

________________________________________
Location: San Diego, California, USA
________________________________________
Even in the Winter, the beaches are crowded in San Diego. It has been even more crowded for the last two weeks because the temperature has been in the low to mid 70’s (F). It is always a challenge to shoot with so many people in your comp. I usually try to find a place to myself, but its not always possible. Fortunately, shooting long exposures can help make the beach look deserted.
________________________________________
My Gear & Settings
⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇
🔹 Camera: Canon 6D
🔹 Lens: Zeiss Distagon T* 21mm f/2.8
🔹 Aperture: f/8
🔹 ISO: 100
🔹 Mode: Manual
🔹 Exposure Time: 4 minutes
🔹 Tripod: Gitzo 5 Series
🔹 Head: RRS BH-55
🔹 Filters: Singh-Ray 10 Stop ND & 1.2 SGND
🔹 This is a single shot, no blending of multiple images
_____________________________________
PHOTO TIP - SUNSET PHOTOGRAPHY - Learn to predict a good sunset. As brilliant as a sunset can be, the effect may only last for a few minutes, so you have to choose your location, set up your camera, and be waiting for the show to start. Be patient to get the best colors. The few minutes the sun is crossing the horizon can be spectacular, but it is not the whole story of a sunset. As the setting sun lights the clouds from below, in many cases, the richest colors can appear up to half an hour after the sun dips below the horizon.
_____________________________________
Thanks so much for the features/mentions this week from:
⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇
🔹 @themessengerweb
🔹 @beautifulworld_pics1
🔹 @allunique
🔹 @great_image
🔹 @sky_perfection
🔹 @sunset_ig
🔹 @world_shotz
🔹 @superb_shots
🔹 @exploringtheglobe
🔹 @frabbiter
🔹 @clubsocial
🔹 @carlos_koji
🔹 @phenomenalshot
🔹 @alecohe
🔹 @brucegetty
_____________________________________
Check out Dan Fields @danfieldsphotog to see his world class images.
_____________________________________
Follow my hub @epic_captures (tag #epic_captures) to be treated to some of the best images on Instagram.
_____________________________________ (at San Diego, California)

________________________________________
Location: San Diego, California, USA
________________________________________
Even in the Winter, the beaches are crowded in San Diego. It has been even more crowded for the last two weeks because the temperature has been in the low to mid 70’s (F). It is always a challenge to shoot with so many people in your comp. I usually try to find a place to myself, but its not always possible. Fortunately, shooting long exposures can help make the beach look deserted.
________________________________________
My Gear & Settings
⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇
🔹 Camera: Canon 6D
🔹 Lens: Zeiss Distagon T* 21mm f/2.8
🔹 Aperture: f/8
🔹 ISO: 100
🔹 Mode: Manual
🔹 Exposure Time: 4 minutes
🔹 Tripod: Gitzo 5 Series
🔹 Head: RRS BH-55
🔹 Filters: Singh-Ray 10 Stop ND & 1.2 SGND
🔹 This is a single shot, no blending of multiple images
_____________________________________
PHOTO TIP - SUNSET PHOTOGRAPHY - Learn to predict a good sunset. As brilliant as a sunset can be, the effect may only last for a few minutes, so you have to choose your location, set up your camera, and be waiting for the show to start. Be patient to get the best colors. The few minutes the sun is crossing the horizon can be spectacular, but it is not the whole story of a sunset. As the setting sun lights the clouds from below, in many cases, the richest colors can appear up to half an hour after the sun dips below the horizon.
________________________________________
Thanks so much for the features/mentions this week from:
⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇
🔹 @themessengerweb
🔹 @beautifulworld_pics1
🔹 @allunique
🔹 @great_image
🔹 @sky_perfection
🔹 @sunset_ig
🔹 @world_shotz
🔹 @superb_shots
🔹 @exploringtheglobe
🔹 @frabbiter
🔹 @clubsocial
🔹 @carlos_koji
🔹 @phenomenalshot
🔹 @alecohe
🔹 @brucegetty
________________________________________
Check out Dan Fields @danfieldsphotog to see his world class images.
_________________________________________
Follow my hub @epic_captures (tag #epic_captures) to be treated to some of the best images on Instagram.
_________________________________________ (at San Diego, California)

________________________________________
Location: San Diego, California, USA
________________________________________
In California, we are fortunate to have colorful sunsets most of the year. The hardest decision for me is always where to shoot. There are so many choices, and each location has advantages and disadvantages. Some of the best spots to shoot, are also usually the most crowded! I usually try to set up far away from people whenever possible, but living in a big tourist city, it is often nearly impossible to do so. One advantage to shooting long exposures is that people usually “disappear” from the image as long as they don’t stand in one spot for too long.
________________________________________
Many people ask me why I shoot long exposure seascapes. For me personally, I like the stark contrast between the static objects in a scene versus the surreal look of the movement of the water and clouds.
________________________________________
My Gear & Settings
⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇
🔹 Camera: Sony A7R
🔹 Lens: Zeiss Distagon T* 21mm f/2.8
🔹 Aperture: f/8
🔹 ISO: 200
🔹 Mode: Manual
🔹 Exposure Time: 2 minutes
🔹 Tripod: Gitzo 5 Series
🔹 Head: RRS BH-55
🔹 Filters: Singh-Ray 4 Stop ND & 0.9 SGND
🔹 This is a single shot, no blending of multiple images
_____________________________________
PHOTO TIP - LONG EXPOSURE PHOTOGRAPHY - I find that long exposure photography often requires more planning, thought, and processing than with my other photography, however the results can be amazing. The basic components of long exposure photography include 1) a sturdy tripod and head, 2) a remote shutter release (wired or wireless), 3) neutral density filters 4) shooting in RAW, 5) having a clean camera sensor, 6) an interesting composition with both static and moving components, 7) ability to shoot in Bulb mode, 8) a timer to track the exposure time, 9) being aware of the available light, and 10) having a lot of patience!
________________________________________
Thanks so much for the features/mentions this week from:
⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇
🔹 @themessengerweb
🔹 @phototag_it
🔹 @greatesttravels
🔹 @sunset_hub
🔹 @instaworld_love
🔹 @clubsocial
🔹 @carlos_koji
🔹 @phenomenalshot
🔹 @alecohe (at San Diego, California)

________________________________________
Location: San Diego, California, USA
________________________________________
In California, Winter waves tend to suck most of the sand out into the ocean and away from the shore. This exposes a lot of the coastal reefs that normally are buried under the sand. Combine this with extreme low tides, and you have an opportunity to get compositions that you normally would not have access to photograph. I climbed down into this slot and set my tripod low to get this perspective. The sides of the reef were about 10 feet tall and were covered with a beautiful green seagrass. As the sun set, the colorful sky reflected on the gentle moving ocean water rising into the slot where I was sitting. Even though there were other people on the beach, I felt like I was the only one around for miles. It was a very calm and peaceful setting.
________________________________________
My Gear & Settings
⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇
🔹 Camera: Sony A7R
🔹 Lens: Zeiss Distagon T* 21mm f/2.8
🔹 Aperture: f/8
🔹 ISO: 100
🔹 Mode: Manual
🔹 Exposure Time: 3.25 minutes
🔹 Tripod: Gitzo 5 Series
🔹 Head: RRS BH-55
🔹 Filters: Singh-Ray 10 Stop ND & 0.6 SGND
🔹 This is a single shot, no blending of multiple images
________________________________________
PHOTO TIP - COMPOSITION: Poor photo composition can make a fantastic subject dull; but a well-set scene can create a wonderful image from the most ordinary of situations. It is critical to understand how all the decisions you make about composition can affect the way a shot looks and how people perceive your photos. The way you frame a shot, choose a focal length, or position objects in a scene can make a big difference in your final image.
________________________________________
Thanks so much for the features/mentions this week from:
⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇
🔹 @chrismoyerphotography
🔹 @awe_inspiringshots
🔹 @ic_longexpo
🔹 @beautifulworld_pics1
🔹 @hdr_pics
🔹 @lewhisperers
🔹 @ip_connect
🔹 @mafiaskylove
🔹 @u_got_framed
🔹 @clubsocial
🔹 @carlos_koji
🔹 @Phenomenalshot
🔹 @alecohe
________________________________________
Check out Dan Fields @danfieldsphotog to see his world class images.
________________________________________ (at San Diego, California)

________________________________________
Location: San Diego, California, USA
________________________________________
The colorful sunsets in San Diego can be pretty amazing. For those of you that have not seen the sunsets here, it can make your jaw drop to see you such fantastic colors changing as the sun drops below the horizon. I was very interested in what causes these colors so I looked it up on Google. It has to do with the molecules and small particles in the atmosphere changing the direction of the sun’s light rays, causing them to scatter. It is too complicated to explain in any great detail, but look it up if you are interested in reading more about it.
________________________________________
My Gear & Settings
⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇
🔹 Camera: Sony A7R
🔹 Lens: Zeiss Distagon T* 21mm f/2.8
🔹 Aperture: f/8
🔹 ISO: 100
🔹 Mode: Manual
🔹 Exposure Time: 3.5 minutes
🔹 Tripod: Gitzo 5 Series
🔹 Head: RRS BH-55
🔹 Filters: Singh-Ray 10 Stop ND & 1.2 SGND
🔹 This is a single shot, no blending of multiple images
________________________________________
PHOTO TIP: USING SOFT GRAD ND FILTERS: When you are shooting sunsets, the sky is almost always brighter than the foreground. If you don’t balance the bright sky with the darker foreground, either the sky will be overexposed, or the foreground will be under exposed, resulting in an image that looks radically different from the real thing. By positioning an ND grad filter in front of the lens so that the dark part of the filter covers the brightest part of the sky, you should be able to evenly balance the exposure. The image can now be captured in one frame, rather than merging multiple images or using HDR.
________________________________________
Thanks so much for the features/mentions this week from:
⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇
🔹 @bestvacations
🔹 @sunset_madness
🔹 @ic_nature
🔹 @neradog
🔹 @clubsocial
🔹 @carlos_koji
🔹 @Phenomenalshot
🔹 @exploringtheglobe
🔹 @alecohe
________________________________________ (at San Diego, California)

Location: Dusk at Glacier Point, Yosemite National Park
_________________________________________
My great friend Dan Fields @danfieldsphotog and I recently returned from another epic trip to Yosemite National Park. What an adventure! The park explodes with such natural beauty, you are always on sensory overload! I took this shot at dusk from Glacier Point looking out towards the iconic Half Dome, just before the sunlight completely faded away. This was the first time I had ever seen linticular clouds. What an amazing sight! The colors and cloud formations were mind blowing; almost to vivid to believe. Many thanks to Dan for his edit of my image!
_________________________________________
A Back Story:
On our previous trip to Yosemite in the Spring, Dan and I were alarmed when we had a close encounter with a big Black Bear while walking on a dirt trail at midnight. On our most recent trip, we actually had four encounters with big Black Bears! The first was when I was walking in the bottom of a rocky dry riverbed. I was looking down while walking, trying not to slip and fall, when Dan started yelling at me from his position high atop the river bank. I looked up, and directly in my path was a 300 pound Black Bear headed right towards me! My first instinct was to run, but logic prevailed and I stopped, then climbed up the steep rocky river bank towards Dan and he pulled me up to safety. Talk about close encounters! We ended up tracking the bear for the next hour or so. This was just one of so many incredible experiences that Dan and I have on our adventures.
_________________________________________
My Gear & Settings
⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇
🔹 Camera: Canon 1DX
🔹 Lens: Canon 70-200mm
🔹 Focal Length: 78mm
🔹 Mode: Manual
🔹 Aperture: f/16
🔹 ISO: 400
🔹 Exposure Time: 5 sec
🔹 Tripod: Gitzo 5 Series
🔹 Head: RRS BH-55
🔹 GPS: Canon GP-E1
🔹 Filters: Singh-Ray & Lee 0.6 ND Soft Grad
_________________________________________
Please be sure to check out Dan Fields’ feed for some epic images.
⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇
🔹 @danfieldsphotog
_________________________________________ (at Yosemite National Park)